The Chicago Bulls have been misinformed about their Draft Day plans. After the fourth overall selection, fans were happy with what Arturas Karnišovas had decided on the day of the design. One of the hot names associated with bulls is Denis Avdiya from Maccabi Tel Aviv.

A 19-year-old Israeli striker enters the NBA with the sound of Luca Doncic, a former Real Madrid and MVP Euroleague star. Both the teams and the fans are happy with the prospect of a European striker, and Avdiya fits that comparison in the eyes of many. I even wrote like him in January as a design for the Bulls. However, the closer the project gets, the clearer it becomes that the Chicago Bulls should not be Denis Avdie’s project. Here are three reasons.

Tensile trends

Last season Denis Avdiya shot 33.3% of the nearest three-point line in Europe and 58.8% of the free throwing line. You can tell all about a young player if you treat him to a three-point shot. However, if the charity band has less than 60% shooters, that’s cause for concern. Often a difficult perspective can be projected on the basis of a good line of sight for improvement. Showing Avdiya as a free-thrower is probably worse than shooting at her from the depths.

Photo : Magriso Sefie/ Euroleague Basketball via Getty Images

The police need players to take the field next to Zack Avalanche and Kobe White. If Avdiya plays on the wing, he will have to be careful to open the courts for the other players. Looks like he’s not the kind of player who can do that now.

Restrictions on defence

Basketball is increasingly a sport that is no longer in the position it once was. But there are always guards and wings and tall people. Avdiya is 1.80 m long and his wingspan suggests that he should play on the wings. Does he have the lateral speed to follow the wings in defense or to be an effective player on the field? The risk of explosion is not entirely clear.

When I went through Denia Avdiya’s defense, I saw what I found: Yam Madar defeated his future teammate in Poland until the end. In a few weeks, they’d take the FIBA apart as teammates in Israel.

I just thought it was kind of cool pic.twitter.com/maeP64FHKa.

– Spencer (@SKPearlman) 26. August 2019.

While Avdiya shows clichés of a good game maker and the Bulls hope that he will be a good shooter, he will need more in the game if these areas do not develop as expected. Looks like he’s got a high level of protection, but you can only get that in the NBA. He has to be more aggressive to compensate for the defensive obligations.

Ground position

Building on the previous point, it may be difficult to have Avdiya on the field while Laurie Markkanen and Wendell Carter Jr. are still in the game. The bulls will really benefit from a three-dimensional wing, associated with this front yard and the avalanche and white, neither of which is very well defended. So the bulls pass a fourth general election on a sixth person who could take the place of Markkans in the future? Maybe. But then go back to point two. Avdiya would be a defensive obstacle in four places.

In general, Dani Avdiya is a fascinating angle. It has the potential to be something special, but it comes with very legitimate concerns. If LaMelo’s ball is available, I’m all for the Bulls to get it. Otherwise swapping is another option if the other team has enough interest to decide which player is eliminated from the first three. We’ll see what happens soon, as the NBA’s plans for the 18th round of the World Series are being prepared. The month of November is planned.

You May Also Like

OTD In 2004: Halo 2 Emerges As The Greatest Video Game Sequel Ever

Halo’s ubiquitous success: Combat Evolved 2001 was the surprising video game of…

White Sox Relief Pitching Needs: Offseason Free-Agent Edition

In recent years the White Sox have masterfully found rough diamonds to…

The Best Former Duke Players In NBA History

The Duke Blue Devils are one of the most polarizing teams in…

NFL DFS Week 8: Locks, Values, and the #CrackUm Player of the Week

At the moment we’re halfway through the NFL season and there’s no…